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Photo Essay, Snap Shot 4 – Food systems and the land

 

November 11, 2021 • 3 min read

Why a Photo Essay? 

This Photo Essay are the result of small groups of young people coming together and asking themselves what it meant to be #Connected2 to the bigger system. 

Why Snap Shots?  

If the Photo Essay was a book, each Snap Shop is  a chapter telling stories from around the world.

This is our fourth Snap Shot!  These photos capture at a glance food systems in Ireland, Malawi, Uganda & Honduras – the land that is a starting point for all of them. Each country prioritises different conditions, depending on the crop – but globally, seasons are becoming increasingly unpredictable due to a rapidly changing climate.

Sarah Fitzgerald’s Photo

credit: Sarah Fitzgerald

Society places value on the commercial products that come from farms & the same society vilifies the methane-emitting cows – little attention is paid to the extraordinary lengths that farmers go to safeguard the earth that feeds us: the carbon sequestered, the trees planted, the biodiversity supported.

Ricardo Ehrler’s Photo

credit: Ricardo Ehrler

Society places value on the commercial products that come from farms & the same society vilifies the methane-emitting cows – little attention is paid to the extraordinary lengths that farmers go to safeguard the earth that feeds us: the carbon sequestered, the trees planted, the biodiversity supported. 

Kwangu Mwenda’s Photo

credit: Kwangu Mwenda

Malawi’s mainstay is agriculture. The small town of Mulanje houses one of the largest tea plantation sites at the foot of Mulanje mountain. Tea contributes greatly to Malawi’s economy & the tea industry turned ~$11 million profit in 2016. Tea estates in Malawi are a source of employment with ~7500 small scale farmers.  

Sarah Fitzgerald’s Photo

credit: Sarah Fitzgerald

In Ireland, farming is mainly a family activity – approx. 18,000 dairy farmers milking ~1.55 million cows. Despite small size, Ireland is the world’s 10th largest dairy exporter – our iconic golden-wrapped butter travel far & wide. Milk from grass-fed cows is richer/creamier – this gives Irish butter a golden glow. These farmers are reliant on healthy grassland -it is in their best interest to protect the climate & ecosystem.

Solomon Sebulime’s Photo   

credit: Solomon Sebulime

Maize is a vital cereal crop in Uganda. Smallholder farmers rely on it for food/income. Maize is grown on well drained, aerated, deep warm loam soils. Adapted to warm conditions with optimum temperature of 30 -34 degrees Celsius, rising temperatures threaten Uganda’s maize production & people who depend on it. 

Ricardo Ehrler’s Photo

credit: Ricardo Ehrler

Distribution is a crucial, often overlooked part of the global food system. Without it, grocery stores, markets, & more, would have empty shelves and stalls. It connects the products of primary processes (farming, milking, butchering, etc) to customers. To ensure that our food systems are truly sustainable, distribution must be a major part. 

 

Interested in joining the #Connected2 campaign or our GOAL Global Youth Program?  Check out our Global Citizenship page or contact the team at globalc@goal.ie for more info.

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